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Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2020

Biological Sciences

Dr Tanmay Bharat
University of Oxford

Dr Hernán Burbano
University College London

Dr Hansong Ma
University of Cambridge

Dr Daniel Streicker
University of Glasgow

Dr Edze Westra
University of Exeter 

History

Dr Sophie Ambler
University of Lancaster

Dr Stefan Hanß
University of Manchester

Dr Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite
University College London

Dr Rian Thum
University of Manchester

Dr Alexia Yates
University of Manchester 

Law

Professor Jeremias Adams-Prassl
University of Oxford

Professor Paul Davies
University College London

Dr Nadine El-Enany
Birkbeck, University of London

Professor Emily Grabham
University of Kent

Dr Guido Rossi
University of Edinburgh

Mathematics and Statistics

Dr Ana Caraiani
Imperial College London

Professor Heather Harrington
University of Oxford

Dr Richard Montgomery
University of Birmingham

Dr Nick Sheridan
University of Edinburgh

Professor Sasha Sodin
Queen Mary, University of London

Philosophy and Theology

Dr Liam Kofi Bright
London School of Economics and Political Science

Dr Elselijn Kingma
King’s College London

Dr Laura Quick
University of Oxford

Dr Emily Thomas
Durham University

Dr Joseph Webster
University of Cambridge

Sociology and Social Policy

Dr Judith Bovensiepen
University of Kent

Dr Emily Dawson
University College London

Dr Kayleigh Garthwaite
University of Birmingham

Dr Nisha Kapoor
University of Warwick

Dr Lucy Mayblin
University of Sheffield
 

2020 citations

Gala Dinner Programme

Biological Sciences

Dr Tanmay Bharat
Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford

Tanmay Bharat is at the forefront of groundbreaking developments in cryo-electron microscopy and tomography and their application to the structural analysis of native molecules within whole cells. He has made significant contributions to understanding viruses, actin-like proteins and DNA segregation in E. coli and has discovered a novel mechanism of phage-mediated antibiotic resistance. His current work is focused on revealing the molecular organisation of one of the most abundant groups of proteins on earth – the surface layer (S-layer) proteins of bacteria and archaea. S-layers determine the ways in which these cells interact with their environments and how they impact on multiple functions, including cell movement, adhesion and biofilm formation. By extending his studies to include model archaeal systems, he aims to understand the fundamental principles that underlie S-layer biogenesis and how these structures are dynamically regulated through the cell cycle.

Dr Hernán A Burbano
Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London

Hernán Burbano’s pioneering work established the new field of herbarium genomics. Having been a member of the original team that sequenced the Neanderthal genome, his more recent research uses DNA extracted from historical herbarium specimens and archaeological plant remains in combination with modern samples to track the history and evolution of plants associated with humans. He has used molecular and computational methods to reconstruct the domestication of crops, for example showing how maize, originally domesticated in present-day Mexico, spread northwards and became adapted to a temperate climate. He has also studied the population history of potatoes and the genes involved in their adaptation to new environments following their arrival in Europe from the Americas in post-Columbian times. In addition, he has traced the evolutionary history of plant pathogens, such as the strain of potato late blight which triggered the Irish potato famine of the mid-nineteenth century.

Dr Hansong Ma
The Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge

Hansong Ma is a world leader in the field of mitochondrial genetics. By isolating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutants and creating animals carrying two mitochondrial genotypes, Dr Ma has made mitochondrial genetics accessible in a multicellular animal. Amongst her groundbreaking research advances, she showed that deleterious mtDNA mutations are selectively eliminated by purifying selection during oogenesis, but certain sequence polymorphisms can grant pathogenic mitochondrial genomes a selfish advantage so that they outcompete functional genomes and impair health. Moreover, Dr Ma demonstrated that homologous recombination occurs in animal mitochondria and capitalised on this to develop the first system to isolate recombinant mtDNA, providing a means to genetically engineer animal mtDNA. By illuminating the mechanisms underlying mtDNA competition and maintenance, her research will lead to interventions that could alleviate or even prevent mitochondrial disease and age-related decline in mtDNA quality.

Dr Daniel Streicker
MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research and Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow

Through his innovative and wide-ranging studies of the evolutionary and ecological processes that govern disease transmission in natural systems, Daniel Streicker has made significant contributions to a fundamentally important area of research. His vampire bat rabies study system is striking for its effective interdisciplinary approach, as well as providing information on the way this lethal disease spreads into human and livestock populations. Dr Streicker’s research has an important applied aspect that, through modelling and hypothesis testing, seeks to develop effective control measures. His research includes understanding how changes in land-use, vampire bat control measures and habitat type influence the maintenance of the rabies virus in rural South America. His research programme marks the start of a ‘big data’ approach to emergent disease prevention.

Dr Edze Westra
Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter

Edze Westra’s work probes the evolutionary underpinnings of an ancient bacterial immune system that might give insights into the workings of our own systems of immunity. Bacteria suffer from virus infections just as humans do and they have evolved their own immune system to repel them. Known as CRISPR, this stores and then remembers the gene sequences of viruses it encounters and when one reappears the CRISPR system literally cuts it apart. Humans have in recent years appropriated the CRISPR system, not to repel viruses, but to recognise and remove or modify unwanted gene sequences in other species, including our own. Dr Westra’s work asks the question of how any immune system can possibly remember everything it has seen. He finds that in large populations, different bacteria CRISPR systems remember different sequences and this can reduce the prevalence of infectious pathogens for everyone. His work has fundamental implications for understanding population-level immunity in human populations at a time when this is urgently needed.

History

Dr Sophie Ambler
Department of History, Lancaster University

Both of Sophie Ambler’s books break new ground in exciting ways. Her first book, on the political role and political thinking of the bishops under Henry III exposed the ‘theocratic nature’ of English politics in the thirteenth century, emphasising the importance for the bishops of scriptural authority and the question of the right to resist tyranny, at a time of great political tension that has traditionally been analysed from a secular constitutional perspective. Especially important in her best-selling second book, on Simon de Montfort, is her awareness of the European context of his career (his father led the Albigensian crusade against the Cathar heretics), along with a subtle understanding of how the ideology of crusading seeped into the political struggles of the English barons. Her future project takes her in new directions, using untapped sources and probing the psychology of war recruits from new perspectives. 

Dr Stefan Hanß
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, University of Manchester 

Stefan Hanẞ is a specialist in the material culture of the early modern period whose research covers Europe, the Americas and Asia and has appeared in German, Italian and Turkish as well as English. His prize-winning PhD on global event-making and the material culture of the Battle of Lepanto (1571) drew on sources in nineteen languages in more than a hundred and seventy archives, libraries and museums (and was published as a three-volume monograph). Dr Hanẞ has pioneered the use of digital microscopes and scientific laboratory analysis for studying the properties of materials such as featherwork and textiles in colonial Peru. The recipient of a British Academy Rising Star Engagement Award (2019), his next project investigates the history of hair in the Habsburg world, examining how head, facial, body and animal hair functioned as a cultural touchstone around which identities and subjectivities revolved, in what he calls a ‘hair-literate society’.

Dr Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite
Department of History, University College London 

Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite is a historian of modern Britain whose work has transformed understandings of social and cultural shifts since 1945, with implications that extend to other countries. Her outstanding book, Class, Politics and the Decline of Deference in England, 1968–2000 (Oxford University Press, 2018) reconstructed a popular discourse of ‘classlessness’ that imagined England as a large, amorphous and diverse middle group which articulated class as snobbery and led to a decline in deference. She complicates the usual story of a transition from social democracy to ‘neoliberalism’ by showing that Margaret Thatcher was more the product than the creator of ‘popular individualism’ and that her aim was for a moral rather than merely economic rejuvenation of Britain. She is now turning to a second major theme. As Britain was the first nation to deindustrialise, she aims to draw on oral history and quantitative data to produce a complex account of its deindustrialisation.

Dr Rian Thum
Manchester China Institute, University of Manchester

Rian Thum is a historian of China and Central Asia, with a particular focus on Islam. His book, The Sacred Routes of Uyghur History (Harvard University Press, 2014) shows how Uyghurs forged a sense of homeland by refashioning manuscripts and accounts of pilgrimage that emanated from the wider Islamic world. While such identity-making projects are usually associated with the spread of printing and nationalism, in the Uyghur case it was driven by the interaction of manuscript technology, sacred places, inter-oasis travel and pious graffiti. His book won four prizes. Dr Thum is currently working on a new book with Harvard University Press that argues that Islamic networks nourished ties between China and India from the sixteenth century to the present. The enduring character of this contact has been overlooked by scholars of Chinese Islam, who have paid insufficient attention to Persian, Turkic and Arabic texts. Dr Thum has been active in engaging policy-makers and journalist on the current situation among the Uyghurs. He is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Asian Studies

Dr Alexia Yates
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, University of Manchester

Alexia Yates is an economic and social historian of modern France who has begun pathbreaking work on the politics, people and practices that transformed property development into a business in late nineteenth-century Paris. She has a particular interest in new groups of market intermediaries – estate agents, architects and joint-stock companies – who were central in creating a commercial market for housing and capitalism more broadly. Her new work will focus on how property relations altered and shaped the emergence of modern imperialism and later decolonisation. Property was important not only to underpinning European sovereignty but also for racialising and dispossessing colonial peoples. Using the French empire as a significant case study (among others), she will explore how property was acquired during the first period of globalisation as well as how it shaped the process and spaces of Europeans’ departures from colonial zones. 

Law

Professor Jeremias Adams-Prassl
Faculty of Law, University of Oxford

Jeremias Adams-Prassl’s work has for some time now charted the transformation of the world of work that has so disrupted the ‘employer–employee’ relationship as to make it almost unrecognisable. He has used imaginative and rigorous research techniques to draw out insights and questions that range way beyond employment law and go right to the heart of how to build and sustain human potential and talent and how to thrive in a fast-changing and borderless organisational context. He understands the engine room of high-velocity international capital markets, its value extraction techniques and the impact these have on how and where people trade their labour, who to, who for and the way they are treated while doing so. His work has been used and cited by courts around Europe. A comparative employment law scholar of international standing, his recently published monograph broke new ground in highlighting the precarity and increased inequality these changes have generated. The focus of his work is now turning to data science, to explore the growing practice of automated and algorithmic management that artificial intelligence ushers in. 

Professor Paul Davies
Faculty of Laws, University College London

Paul Davies is one of the leading common law scholars of his generation, with a broad interest in private, especially contract and commercial, law. His prize-winning monograph Accessory Liability (Hart Publishing, 2015), examined the neglected topic of civil claims against third parties who participate in wrongdoing. This original work has been relied upon by appellate courts both in the UK and overseas. As part of his Philip Leverhulme Prize-funded research, Professor Davies will build upon his 2015 monograph to examine the role of intermediaries in commercial law. Other strands of this project will survey the limits of contract law and investigate the practically important topic of overlapping claims and remedies. The different strands of this ambitious research agenda all address commercially significant topics which are currently under-researched. A key ambition running through his past and proposed work has been to improve the efficacy of our commercial law through a deeper understanding of its practical workings. It is anticipated that this future work will also be relied upon by judges and law reform agencies in this country and internationally.

Dr Nadine El-Enany
Department of Law, Birkbeck, University of London

Nadine El-Enany, Reader in Law and Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Race and Law at Birkbeck, is a scholar of migration and race. She has established herself as a leading voice in the highly salient debate about the continuing impact of Britain’s colonial past on its legal and social system. Her recent monograph, (B)ordering Britain: Law, Race and Empire (Manchester University Press, 2021), has reached not only a legal but also a wider scholarly and public audience. She now plans to analyse how racial inequality is mapped onto space and realises itself in the distribution of resources such as clean air: a topic that will surely become a central object of scholarly and social concern in the wake of the pandemic. Dr El-Enany’s project will use socio-legal and critical tools to broaden our understanding of the intersection between race and the environment and to prompt a re-examination of how state violence is conceptualised.

Professor Emily Grabham
Kent Law School, University of Kent

Emily Grabham is a leading socio-legal scholar who has produced an impressive body of imaginative and highly original work on law and time. She skilfully and effectively combines theoretical analysis with ambitious empirical examination of the precise workings of regulation. Professor Grabham’s exploration of the mutual shaping of law and time is underpinned by a concern with equalities, paying close attention to how people experience time. Her research engages with crucial areas of law, cutting across legal sub-disciplines. The brilliance of her writings have been widely recognised and her work is held in the highest esteem within and beyond the legal discipline. She has been awarded prestigious prizes for her monograph Brewing Legal Times: Things, Form and the Enactment of Law (University of Toronto Press, 2016) and her articles ‘Time and Technique: The Legal Lives of the 26 Week Qualifying Period’ and ‘Doing Things with Time: Flexibility, Adaptability, and Elasticity in UK Equality Cases’.

Dr Guido Rossi
School of Law, University of Edinburgh

Guido Rossi is a leading legal historian of his generation. His research has been archival, but in a very distinctive way. Rather than be content with the idea that there was some form of universal lex mercatoria in the medieval and early modern period, he has sought to discover what merchants actually did. He has examined their letters and private business records. He studies with great skill not just the primary sources in many languages, but also engages fastidiously with a wide range of other sources about how business worked during that period. His conclusion overturns accepted wisdom and shows that English commercial law developed in ways very similar to other European countries, rather than distinctively. He has been able to immerse himself in the scholarly works on medieval canon law and civil law and link these with commercial law. Dr Rossi has transformed this area of legal history by comparative scholarship and by showing the importance of legal practice and practice-related works, complementing scholarly works as sources for understanding the law. His scholarly and erudite work is already shaping the future landscape of legal historical scholarship. 

Mathematics and Statistics

Dr Ana Caraiani
Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London

Ana Caraiani is an early career researcher who has already established herself at the international vanguard of number theory and algebraic geometry. Her research illuminates deep connections between these fields and has been described by referees as fearless, beautiful and groundbreaking. She is a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society and winner of a European Mathematical Society Prize. This fast-growing field provides a new framework for much of pure mathematics and, together with her collaborators, Dr Caraiani has helped to shape it with new insights which settle longstanding problems while pointing the way to new mathematics.

Professor Heather Harrington
Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford

Heather Harrington works on algebraic systems biology and topological data analysis. Her research addresses deep problems in complex systems and reaction networks widely occurring in biological processes, such as in cell signalling. She applies highly theoretical approaches and computational methods, ranging from algebraic, geometric to topological, to analyse both models and data. This has resulted in important new insights into the pathways involved in cancer, as well as in neuronal networks. Her research also addresses the various ways diseases may spread, not just within an individual, but also in a population. Her advances in data analysis have led to new, robust methods for dealing with noisy data (a common situation), in particular estimating the shape of parameter space in models. She has developed and promoted several powerful numerical software packages, perhaps most notably tools for computing persistent homology in topological data analysis. Moreover, she has shared this software with the wider academic community. She won both the 2018 Whitehead Prize and the 2019 Adams Prize.

Dr Richard Montgomery
School of Mathematics, University of Birmingham

Richard Montgomery received his PhD in 2015 from the University of Cambridge and, following a Junior Research Fellowship at Trinity College, Cambridge, joined the University of Birmingham in 2018. His research is in Probabilistic and Extremal Graph Theory, and has often focused on solving hard long-standing problems with new and influential methods. His solution to an important conjecture of Kahn, among other work, saw him awarded the 2019 European Prize in Combinatorics. More recently, with Pokrovskiy (UCL) and Sudakov (ETH) he solved Ringel’s conjecture from 1963 for large complete graphs (a major graph packing question) and, with Hong Liu (Warwick), the odd cycle problem of Erdos and Hajnal from 1966.

Dr Nick Sheridan
School of Mathematics, University of Edinburgh

Nick Sheridan is one of the leading researchers worldwide in symplectic topology and homological mirror symmetry (HMS). His work is characterised by technical brilliance supported by beautiful geometrical insight and creativity and he has made profound contributions to our understanding of Fukaya categories and of HMS. Ever since his 2012 PhD, his ideas have moved this research field in completely novel directions. In work of great originality and prominence, he resolved the influential conjecture of Kontsevich from 1994 in its central form, namely that HMS holds for the quintic threefold and moreover for Fano and Calabi–Yau hypersurfaces in projective spaces of all dimensions. In joint work with Sheel Ganatra and Tim Perutz, he proved that classical mirror symmetry can be recovered as a corollary of HMS. In recent work with Ivan Smith, he has displayed an impressive ability to blend modern concepts from homological algebra and topology in order to advance symplectic geometry.

Professor Sasha Sodin
School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London

Sasha Sodin has made significant contributions to random matrix theory and the theory of random Schrödinger operators. Since Wigner’s pioneering work in the 1950s, random matrices have served as fundamental models for complex quantum systems. Professor Sodin’s work on random matrices has settled a number of open problems and conjectures in the subject. His most celebrated result is the proof of a limit theorem for the distribution of the largest eigenvalue of random band matrices, with the limit depending on the width of the band relative to the matrix size. A striking feature is the appearance of Airy process in the appropriate scaling limit, when the band width is much greater than the matrix size raised to the power 5/6. He has furthermore contributed to the rigorous understanding of Anderson localisation in various higher-dimensional disordered systems, using an impressive combination of techniques from classical analysis and probability theory. 

Philosophy and Theology

Dr Liam Kofi Bright
Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, London School of Economics and Political Science

Liam Kofi Bright is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He works on social epistemology, focusing on how scientific institutional structures affect our ability to produce and disseminate knowledge. His influential articles have creatively applied the mathematical techniques of formal epistemology to these problems. He plans to use similar methods to build bridges between core areas of analytic philosophy and pioneering figures in Africana philosophy, in particular by exploring the ideas of the under-appreciated Ghanaian philosopher Kwasi Wiredu on cultural universals in relation to contemporary social epistemology and on truth in relation to contemporary philosophical logic.

Professor Elselijn Kingma
Department of Philosophy, King’s College London

Elselijn Kingma is a philosopher with a degree in medicine, whose previous work concerns the conceptualisation of health, the ways in which biology and engineering combine in the newly developed field of synthetic biology and the metaphysics of pregnancy. For example, she has disputed the view that the foetus is contained in pregnancy, arguing instead that the relation of foetus to mother is a part–whole relation. The project she will pursue with Leverhulme funding develops her thinking on pregnancy and early childhood. One focal point of the planned research is ectogestative or ‘artificial womb’ technology. Another is whether, on her understanding of the maternal–foetal relation, sub-optimal foetal outcomes due, for example, to a mother’s smoking or drinking, are properly understood as doing harm to the foetus.

Dr Laura Quick
Faculty of Theology and Religion, University of Oxford

Laura Quick’s groundbreaking research on the Hebrew Bible, along with superb linguistic and literary skills, benefits from close engagement with studies in material culture, history of medicine and sociology. She explores the various genres and modes of discourse found in the Hebrew Bible against the background of ancient Near Eastern literary culture. Dr Quick studies gender, dress and social status as means of communication in the ancient literary records, thus greatly enhancing our understanding of the social world which produced the Hebrew Bible. She will work on beauty and aesthetics in the Hebrew Bible, opening up new perspectives on the ancient social, intellectual and philosophical values which animate and inform ancient Near Eastern literature.

Dr Emily Thomas
Department of Philosophy, Durham University

Emily Thomas’s research focuses on seventeenth to twentieth century Anglo-American metaphysics. With her three most recent books she has not only attracted the attention of experts and won international prizes and major research awards, but found a wider readership. Absolute Time: Rifts in Early Modern British Metaphysics (Oxford University Press, 2018) traces the revolutionary changes in the metaphysics of time that occurred in the seventeenth century. Early Modern Women on Metaphysics (Cambridge University Press, 2018), an edited volume, celebrates the major role women philosophers played during that period. Highly praised on publication it has since become a set text on philosophy reading lists worldwide. The Meaning of Travel: Philosophers Abroad (Oxford University Press, 2020) explores philosophical issues related to travel, from the ‘Age of Discovery’ to the present day. Widely discussed and celebrated in popular media it has established the author’s reputation as a public intellectual. In her current research, Dr Thomas continues her work on the history of time theories and on American and British women philosophers of the nineteenth century.

Dr Joseph Webster
Department of Divinity, University of Cambridge

Joseph Webster is a leading anthropologist of religion and his published works – particularly his monographs The Anthropology of Protestantism (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) and The religion of Orange politics (Manchester University Press, 2020) – have been internationally recognised as offering the most prominent statement to date of the anthropology–theology dialogue. His significant achievements include two immersive ethnographic studies of contemporary Protestantism in Scotland – on millenarianism among the Exclusive Brethren and ethno-religious nationalism among the Orange Order. With the successful completion of this research, he is now well equipped to begin his next major project: a comparative study of apocalyptic Protestant communities in Co. Antrim, Ulster’s so-called ‘Bible Belt’. Transferring his distinctive, innovative and interdisciplinary methodology from Scotland to Northern Ireland, Dr Webster will conduct a multi-sited study of Protestant fundamentalist sociality and eschatology in order to understand the moral dynamics of religiously conservative millenarian communities in Antrim and the theologies they represent. 

Sociology and Social Policy

Dr Judith Bovensiepen
School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent

Judith Bovensiepen, an anthropologist at the University of Kent, is a highly distinctive researcher and a leading expert on East Timor and Southeast Asia. Her doctoral thesis, which turned into her first book, The Land of Gold (Cornell University Press, 2015), explored how displaced people returning to their ancestral lands interact with their environment. Her proposed research investigates oil and gas corporations and the ways in which these corporations (and states) engage in forms of ‘wilful blindness’, when it involves the extraction of natural resources. Dr Bovensiepen argues for the need for a different approach to understanding the disconnect between corporate action and the self-professed commitment to sustainability and social responsibility. This ethnography will form the basis for another monograph. Her research has strong potential impact, as it addresses ideas about corporate responsibility and the effects of oil development in developing societies such as East Timor. This research will also provide important insights into the effects of development in neighbouring countries.

Dr Emily Dawson
Department of Science and Technology Studies, University College London 

Emily Dawson is interested in how structural inequalities affect people’s experiences of science in their day-to-day lives. Her aim is to help make ‘public’ science accessible for all and she is a member of various advisory boards and research networks in the UK, Europe and the US. Her book, Equity, Exclusion and Everyday Science Learning (Routledge, 2019), reporting ethnographic work with various communities (including Asian, Somali, Afro-Caribbean, Latin American and Sierra Leonean) was nominated for several prizes and widely discussed. This work is theoretically rich, examining intersectionality, social justice, identity ‘performance’ and social reproduction. As Dr Dawson writes, ‘science communication practices construct a narrow public that reflects the shape, values and practices of dominant groups, at the expense of the marginalised’. A future project on the ‘co-construction of race/ethnicity and science in popular culture’ will address this, bridging science and technology studies, sociology of education and cultural studies. 

Dr Kayleigh Garthwaite
Department of Social Policy, Sociology and Criminology, University of Birmingham

Kayleigh Garthwaite will build on her pioneering ethnographic research into the experiences of food banks in England, documented in her award-winning book, Hunger Pains: Life Inside Foodbank Britain (Polity Press, 2016). Through her work she has detailed the impact of welfare reform, social disadvantage and health inequalities on food poverty. She will extend her empirical gaze to explore food banks in the US and Canada as well as the UK, with a particular focus on the normalisation of food charity. This in turn prompts questions around the entrenchment, institutionalisation and corporatisation of food charity. What is the relationship between governments, non-profit and commercial sectors in the provision of charitable food? Are there policy alternatives to charitable food? How might those experiencing food poverty gain an effective voice? This research is poignant and timely as we live through and experience the aftermath of a pandemic.

Dr Nisha Kapoor
Department of Sociology, University of Warwick

Nisha Kapoor has fast established herself as a leading voice in race, citizenship and state security studies, with a series of works on segregation, colonial governmentalities, Islamophobia and the rise of racial neoliberalism in the UK and the US. In her book, Deport, Deprive, Extradite (Verso Books, 2018), Dr Kapoor takes frontline critical race theory, international relations and criminology deep into the murky territory of state surveillance and punishment during the ‘War on Terror’. In next steps, she is extending her work to technologies and state bordering practices in China and India. Her analysis maps the emergent institutional configuration of surveillance regimes embedded in state–corporate partnerships and their broader political economy. As well as its political urgency and insistence on the human dimension of individual narratives, Dr Kapoor’s writing is notable for its deft combination of theory, methods and documentation. She was the recipient of a ESRC Future Research Leaders award 2015–2018.

Dr Lucy Mayblin
Department of Sociological Studies, University of Sheffield

In a remarkably short space of time, Lucy Mayblin has developed an exciting and significant body of research that examines themes of migration, asylum, citizenship and (post)colonial legacies in the context of a globalised socio-political and cultural environment. Her work covers migration and asylum-seeking in the UK from a variety of angles but also extends beyond UK borders to other European countries, particularly Poland. Arguably more important however, is Dr Mayblin’s imaginative theorisation of the impacts of human movement in a global environment where perceptions of mobility are increasingly contested. In her forthcoming research, Dr Mayblin will be investigating the idea of ‘crimes of solidarity’ – laws that ‘make it illegal for citizens to support irregular migrants across the world’. She will develop a conceptual framework to advance awareness and understanding of crimes of solidarity. This framework will, in turn, shed light not only on the current attitudes of a range of governments to asylum-seekers and refugees, but also on prevailing official interpretations of the idea of citizenship and what it means to be a ‘citizen’. 

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