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Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2014

Biological Sciences 

Professor Michael Brockhurst 
University of York 
Evolutionary biology and experimental evolution 

Dr Elizabeth Murchison 
University of Cambridge 
Cancer genetics 

Professor Ewa Paluch 
University College London 
Cell biophysics 

Dr Thomas Richards 
University of Exeter 
Evolutionary genomics of eukaryotic cellular complexity and microbial diversity 

Dr Nikolay Zenkin 
Newcastle University 
Biochemistry and molecular biology of gene expression 

History

Professor Manuel Barcia Paz 
University of Leeds 
Atlantic slavery and slave trade history; Brazil and Cuba (nineteenth century) 

Dr Aaron Moore 
University of Manchester 
Comparative history of East Asia 

Dr Renaud Morieux 
University of Cambridge 
Anglo-French relations in the eighteenth century in Europe and empires 

Dr Hannah Skoda 
University of Oxford 
Medieval socio-cultural history, particularly violence and reactions to change 

Dr David Trippett 
University of Bristol 
Music history, nineteenth century intellectual history, aesthetics and media theory 

Mathematics and Statistics 

Dr Alexandros Beskos 
University College London 
Computational statistics and Monte-Carlo methods 

Dr Daniel Kral 
University of Warwick 
Graph theory, extremal combinatorics and theoretical computer science 

Dr David Loeffler 
University of Warwick 
and 
Dr Sarah Zerbes 
University College London 
Number theory 

Professor Richard Samworth 
University of Cambridge 
Nonparametric and high-dimensional statistics 

Dr Corinna Ulcigrai 
University of Bristol 
Dynamical systems and ergodic theory 

Philosophy and Theology 

Dr Jonathan Birch 
London School of Economics and Political Science 
Philosophy of the biological and behavioural sciences 

Dr Tim Button 
University of Cambridge 
Metaphysics, philosophies of logic, language, and mathematics 

Professor Ofra Magidor 
University of Oxford 
Philosophy of logic and language, metaphysics, epistemology and philosophy of mathematics 

Dr Anna Mahtani 
London School of Economics and Political Science 
Philosophy of probability and philosophy of logic and language 

Dr Holger Michael Zellentin 
University of Nottingham 
Qur’anic studies and Jewish studies 

Law 

Professor Alan Bogg 
University of Oxford 
International, European and Comparative Labour Law 

Dr Prabha Kotiswaran 
King’s College London 
Feminist legal theory, criminal law, rape, trafficking, sex work, sexual violence, and the sociology of law 

Dr Sarah Nouwen 
University of Cambridge 
International criminal law, the intersections of law and politics and peace processes 

Professor Erika Rackley 
University of Birmingham 
Gender and diversity in the judiciary and legal profession 

Dr Michael Waibel 
University of Cambridge 
International (economic) law, international dispute settlement, law and economics 

Sociology and Social Policy 

Dr Lucie Cluver 
University of Oxford 
Preventing HIV-infection and reducing social disadvantage for AIDS affected children 

Dr Hazem Kandil 
University of Cambridge 
Revolution and war in the modern Middle East, France and the US 

Dr Victoria Redclift 
University of Surrey 
The sociology of migration and political exclusion 

Dr Katherine Smith 
University of Edinburgh 
Public health and inequalities 

Dr Imogen Tyler 
University of Lancaster 
The sociology of inequality; social and cultural theory

2014 citations

Biological Sciences

Professor Michael Brockhurst
Department of Biology, University of York

Michael Brockhurst is one of the leading evolutionary ecologists of his generation. He carries out world-leading research at the interface of evolutionary biology and medical microbiology. He has exploited whole genome data and experimental evolution techniques to make major advances in our understanding of the coevolution of species interactions, providing the first direct experimental evidence at the molecular level for the Red Queen hypothesis. He has also carried out pioneering work on sociality in bacterial populations, and on the evolutionary dynamics of bacterial infections. Working with NHS clinicians, he has applied evolutionary thinking to show that rapid bacterial evolution has important consequences for the development of novel antimicrobials, and for the prognosis and treatment of chronic bacterial infections such as cystic fibrosis. In addition to his core scientific work, which is supported by a range of highly competitive grants, his public engagement work has led to collaborative work with artists and technologists funded by the Arts Council and the Wellcome Trust.
http://www.york.ac.uk/biology/research/ecology-evolution/michael-brockhu...

Dr Elizabeth Murchison
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge

Cancers are a class of disease caused by cells that multiply out of control inside our bodies. They are one of the leading causes of mortality, especially in aging populations. Up until recently it was assumed that cancers die together with the individuals they have made ill. But that consensus has now been overturned by Elizabeth Murchison who studies a rare form of cancer that can be transmitted from one individual to another like an infectious disease. So far this infectious cancer has only been observed in dogs and in the Tasmanian Devil, a small marsupial mammal that lives in Tasmania. Tasmanian devils spread the cancer by biting each other, and in dogs it is spread by sexual activity, making their cancer a venereal disease. Remarkably, Murchison has been able to show that each of these cancers arose just once in a single individual, and have continued to survive as cancerous cells get transmitted to others. In the case of dogs, Murchison has shown that the founding individual lived around 11,000 years ago. Murchison’s work raises questions of profound importance to the field of cancer studies. How, for example, do these infectious cancer cells escape detection by the new host’s immune systems? And, if these infectious cancers can exist in dogs and Tasmanian devils, do they also exist – as yet undetected – in other mammals, including humans?
http://www.vet.cam.ac.uk/directory/murchison

Professor Ewa Paluch
MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology, University College London

Ewa Paluch is one of the leading exponents of research at the interface of physics and biology, applying biophysical techniques and quantitative imaging to address fundamental questions in cell biology. Dr Paluch has carried out pioneering research into the biophysical mechanisms regulating cell shape, cell division and cell movement. Her research focuses on the role of the actin cortex, which enables the cell to exert mechanical force and resist external stresses. Dr Paluch has made a major contribution to life science and is a world leader in her field.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/lmcb/research-group/ewa-paluch-research-group

Professor Thomas Richards
College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter

Tom Richards investigates the relationship between genome evolution, cellular organisation and microbial ecology. He has pioneered the use of whole genome data to understand the evolution of cellular traits and the likely characteristics of the last universal common ancestor to eukaryotic organisms. In a very short period of time, he has developed a world-leading reputation in understanding the role that horizontal gene transfer has played in the evolution of pathogenic lineages in very diverse groups of micro-organisms. His work provides completely new insight into the evolutionary diversity of microbial eukaryotes and is re-defining the tree of life. Professor Richards’s exceptional publications and recent discoveries demonstrate that he is a true leader in the field of evolutionary genomics. 
http://biosciences.exeter.ac.uk/staff/index.php?web_id=tom_richards

Dr Nikolay Zenkin
Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Newcastle University

Professor Zenkin is awarded a Philip Leverhulme Prize for his distinguished and groundbreaking research into the mechanisms controlling information flow from DNA into RNA at the level of the molecular enzymology of the complex multi-subunit RNA polymerase. Zenkin’s work is characterised by his penetrating use of biochemistry and genetics to discover mechanisms controlling RNA polymerase functionality, with wide ranging implications for all genetic systems. Currently at Newcastle University, Zenkin has studied at the Institute of Molecular Genetics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and at the Waksman Institute, Rutgers University in the USA. 
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/camb/staff/profile/nikolay.zenkin

History

Dr Manuel Barcia Paz
School of Languages, Cultures and Societies, University of Leeds

Manuel Barcia Paz has made pioneering contributions to the history of slavery and the slave trade in the nineteenth century in three monographs distinguished by their originality of argument, and by the ingenious work with difficult archives in three widely-separated locations (Cuba, Spain, and Brazil) and two languages which underpin them. Seeds of Insurrection: Domination and Slave Resistance on Cuban Plantations (2008) uses colonial records to open to us the inner world of slave society with an extraordinary subtlety. The Great African Slave Revolt of 1825 (2012) is the first major study of what was an important early nineteenth-century slave rebellion. One of its key insights, made possibly by Barcia Paz’s discovery of sources which indicated the African ethnic groups from which rebels came, was that Africans who had significant military experience in Africa were central to the revolt. This led to his third book, the West African Warfare in Cuba and Brazil (2014), a powerful ‘connective history’ which shows the interlinked character of war in Africa and slave rebellions in two otherwise disconnected theatres of New World slavery. In his latest work, he examines the linked histories of sports and politics in twentieth-century Cuba and the United States. Barcia Paz combines the careful gaze of the microhistorian on individual actors with a capacity to see the larger regional and global connections which bridge Cuba and Brazil to Latin America, to West Africa, and North America.
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/profile/125056/156/manuel_barcia_paz

Dr Aaron Moore
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, University of Manchester

Dr Aaron Moore is an historian with a special interest in East Asia. Having received his PhD in 2006 from Princeton, he held temporary appointments at Harvard University, the University of Virginia and the University of Oxford and since 2010 he has been a lecturer at Manchester. His principal publication to date is a monograph (Harvard UP, 2013) which examines the lived experience of Japanese soldiers at war through their diaries, comparing their responses to training, propaganda and battlefield experience with that of their American counterparts. He has also published numerous shorter pieces and peer-reviewed articles. The panel was impressed by the ambition of his work, its comparative and transnational scope, and also by his skilful use of difficult sources in a number of Asian languages. Developing his interest in the subjective and the personal, Dr Moore intends to use diaries to explore the mentalities of Chinese communists as they, too, evolved from ordinary citizens into ‘good’ Maoists. He is also eager to follow the development of futuristic and utopian thought in a comparative context in Russia, China, Turkey and Japan, primarily through the prism of popular media and science fiction. To this end, he hopes to use some of his prize money to learn Turkish. 
http://www.manchester.ac.uk/research/aaron.moore

Dr Renaud Morieux
Faculty of History, University of Cambridge

Renaud Morieux was educated in France (at the École Normale Supérieure) and England and has taught in France and, now, at Cambridge. He has written a remarkable book (soon to be translated into English) on the English Channel/La Manche as a zone of encounter between the French and the English during the long eighteenth century – the book covers geography, cartography, fortifications, maritime law, smuggling, commerce, travel and much else; he has a further equally remarkable book on French and English prisoners of war forthcoming. He is that rare thing, a genuinely comparative historian, equally at home in the archives of two nations, and able to throw illumination on the history of both by bringing out unexpected similarities and differences. He will now be writing a book on international customary law in the eighteenth century, and will be extending his enquiries to archives in India and North America.
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/directory/rm656@cam.ac.uk

Dr Hannah Skoda
Faculty of History, University of Oxford

Hannah Skoda, who has been Fellow and Tutor of St John’s College Oxford since 2010, has made highly original contributions to the study of violence in late medieval Europe. In her prize-winning book, Medieval Violence: Physical Brutality in Northern France, 1270–1330, she developed pioneering methods of analysis, focusing her attention on the disempowered. Using the insights of anthropology and of literary scholarship, she has uncovered the ways in which violence was used to negotiate social relations. Her interest has extended to student riots and domestic violence as well as political protest. Her next project concerns nostalgia in fourteenth-century Europe, embracing both pastoral idylls and chivalric ideals.
http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/faculty/staff/profile/skoda.html

Dr David Trippett
Department of Music, University of Bristol

David Trippett has already gained international recognition for his highly innovative approach to the history of nineteenth-century music. His prize-winning study of Wagner’s melodies confronts some of the basic issues of musical aesthetics, while at the same time setting them securely within the cultural context of their times. Not only does he examine the different ways in which Wagner’s contemporaries wrote about the effects of melody; he also shows how their views engage with some of the fundamental scientific questions of the day, and specifically those that relate to the bodily senses and the human capacity for speech. This is indeed path-breaking research. Dr Trippett lays out a new agenda for the writing of musical history, in which he himself seems well placed to assume a leading role.
http://www.davidtrippett.com/

Law

Professor Alan Bogg
Faculty of Law, University of Oxford

Alan Bogg is one of the foremost academic labour lawyers of his generation, producing work that is legally rigorous, whilst also being theoretically informed and transnational in scope. His reconceptualisation of collective bargaining law is recognised as amongst the most significant works in labour law published in the common law world in recent times. Using concepts in liberal political philosophy, he has tracked changing legal strategies and public policies in workers’ rights in recent years, and argues for an understanding of collective labour relations grounded in a civic republican politics. His work also demonstrates how analysis of national legal approaches can be enriched by deep comparative awareness. His defence of a conception of freedom of association that encompasses a fundamental right to collective bargaining, for example, engages work on recent Canadian approaches to freedom of association. More recent work on the legal and theoretical dimensions of ‘voices at work’ is a uniquely systematic study comparing Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States. In focusing on the collective dimensions of work relations, Alan Bogg’s original and creative work could hardly be more important, at a time when the regulation of the labour market has come into renewed prominence as a central political issue in this age of austerity.
http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/profile/bogga

Dr Prabha Kotiswaran
Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London

Prabha Kotiswaran has an outstanding record of achievement in interdisciplinary research on gender and law. A scholar whose work has truly international reach, as well as broad implications for socio-legal theory, she has established a world-wide reputation for her studies of human trafficking and sex work. Her 2011 monograph, Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor: Sex Work and the Law in India, which won the SLSA-Hart Book Prize for Early Career Academics, demonstrated the adverse consequences on sex workers of the increased criminalisation of prostitution and argued for a reframing of sex work in terms of labour instead. She will use her Leverhulme Prize to extend this research in three related directions: a monograph subjecting the law’s treatment of women’s labour in sex work, dancing, surrogacy and domestic work to critical examination; an edited volume evaluating the criminal justice approach of international law on human trafficking; and two books developing her collaborative work on ‘governance feminism’, assessing feminists’ success in governance projects, particularly criminal law reform. The extension work will likely have considerable political and social significance.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/law/people/academic/pkotiswaran.aspx

Dr Sarah Nouwen
Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge

Since receiving her doctorate in 2010, Sarah Nouwen’s courageous and ground breaking research into the impact of the International Criminal Court in conflict situations has established her as a leading scholar of international law. Her outstanding work combines innovative empirical insights with theoretical sophistication and legal analysis. She skilfully and effectively tests the claimed ideals of international criminal law against practice, revealing the realities of legal interventions in highly complex and sensitive environments, including conflict zones. Dr Nouwen’s extensive fieldwork has so far been completed with the assistance of a string of small grants and awards. The award of the Leverhulme prize will enable her to pursue important empirical work into peace negotiations in international law. 
http://www.lcil.cam.ac.uk/people/sarah-nouwen

Professor Erika Rackley
Birmingham Law School, University of Birmingham

Professor Rackley is a brilliant feminist scholar who has held two chairs even though she is only 38. It is almost ten action-packed years since she attained her doctorate but there are no signs of her slowing down – she will shortly be taking up a highly competitive British Academy mid-career fellowship. As this suggests, the candidate has clearly demonstrated significant past achievements with an international impact. Her recent monograph on Women, Judging and the Judiciary was awarded the 2013 Peter Birks prize – probably the most prestigious book prize for legal academics in the UK and Ireland. She was a co-investigator in the seminal ESRC Feminist Judgments project which has had a major international impact and is now being copied in other parts of the world. Professor Rackley has also been highly influential in the judicial diversity debate in the past few years in England and Wales. Engaged and relevant, the law panel had few concerns about her future promise, considering her project proposal to have the potential to be ground-breaking in academic and policy terms, as well as challenging and ambitious. 
http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/law/staff/profile.aspx?ReferenceId=8...

Dr Michael Waibel
Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge

Michael Waibel has an outstanding portfolio of research on legal aspects of sovereign debts and defaults including a prize-winning monograph which has been highly influential in the field. His scholarship has had a major impact on perceptions of the legal framework for sovereign debt and of the viability of recourse to international fora for the settlement of sovereign debt disputes arising from emerging markets to the Eurozone. Dr Waibel’s highly original work also explores potential parallels between insolvent countries and insolvent companies, analogies between standard form contracts in domestic law and model treaties, and the impact on the development of international law. He brings to his scholarship a deep understanding of the political and economic factors that shape the development of international law and the international economic system, which he combines with strong historical and comparative perspectives.
http://www.lcil.cam.ac.uk/people/michael-waibel

Mathematics and Statistics

Dr Alexandros Beskos
Department of Statistical Science, University College London

Dr Alexandros Beskos is a Senior Lecturer in Statistics at University College London and one of the most promising statisticians of his generation. He works in computational statistics and is particularly interested in the theory and applications of Monte-Carlo methods. Many of his projects are linked to overcoming the ‘curse of dimensionality’, namely that the established methods in statistics often become ineffective in high or infinite dimensions. His work is not only highly influential in statistics, but also in applied probability and applied mathematics more generally. He is a leading expert for sampling in high-dimensional spaces and, in collaboration with Roberts, he developed the first known exact algorithm for the sampling of diffusions. This work constitutes a major breakthrough in Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods and opened the path to exact inference for diffusions. He has also made important contributions to sequential Monte Carlo methods, showing that advanced design can lead to stable methods even in very high dimensions. This is a hot topic with important applications, for example in geophysics and fluid dynamics. More recently he started a collaboration applying modern methods of computational statistics to complex biostatistics models. He is a founding member of the Applied Probability Section of the Royal Statistical Society (RSS) and has served the section in a variety of roles.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/statistics/people/alexandrosbeskos

Dr Daniel Kral
Mathematics Institute and Department of Computer Science, University of Warwick

Daniel Kral is one of the top young mathematicians in the country working in the area of combinatorics. One of his major results is that the number of perfect matchings in a cubic graph is exponential: previously, even obtaining superlinear lower bounds had been a significant challenge. He has also proved interesting “removal lemmas” for systems of equations in subsets of finite fields and more general Abelian groups, and shown that a permutation of the first n integers that mixes up the ordering of a random four points with the expected frequencies must be quasirandom, and therefore for any fixed k must mix up the ordering of k points with the expected frequencies as well. These are just a few of his results, several of which, including the three just mentioned, have solved significant open problems.
http://www.ucw.cz/~kral/

Dr David Loeffler
Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick

and 
Dr Sarah Zerbes
Department of Mathematics, 
University College London
A Philip Leverhulme Prize in Mathematics and Statistics is awarded to Dr David Loeffler and Dr Sarah Zerbes for their joint work in Number Theory. Their outstanding achievement is the construction of an Euler System associated with the convolution of modular forms. Euler Systems have been viewed as particularly important since the first one was produced by Kolyvagin and used to prove cases of the conjectures of Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer concerning the arithmetic of elliptic curves. The results of Loeffler and Zerbes have similarly impressive applications.
Since Kolyvagin’s work, only a handful of new Euler systems have been found, all by extremely special methods. A particular attraction of the methods of Loeffler and Zerbes is that their approach promises to be effective in broader circumstances. 
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/maths/people/staff/david_loeffler/
http://www.homepages.ucl.ac.uk/~ucahsze/index.html

Professor Richard Samworth
Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics, University of Cambridge

Richard Samworth is awarded a Phillip Leverhulme for his broad and influential foundational and methodological contributions to many areas of Statistics, including non-parametric maximum likelihood, classification; high-dimensional penalised regression and model selection; density estimation; and the bootstrap. His seminal contributions on nonparametric classification, one of the most important and rapidly growing areas on the interface between Statistics and Machine Learning, have had a profound impact on the development of the field. He has also demonstrated outstanding leadership qualities in his activities on behalf of many of the world’s leading statistical societies and journals, and his work in building up Statistics within the University of Cambridge.
http://www.statslab.cam.ac.uk/~rjs57/

Dr Corinna Ulcigrai
School of Mathematics, University of Bristol

Dr Corinna Ulcigrai has made major contributions to ergodic theory and dynamical systems and is acknowledged as one of the leaders of her generation in those fields. In particular, in a paper based on her PhD thesis she has solved an important long-standing problem on the ergodic properties of locally Hamiltonian flows on surfaces by showing that typically such flows are not mixing. With K. Fraczek she also proved an important result that surprised leading experts in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics from both mathematics and physics. This result shows that, for a broad class of billiard dynamics that includes the 100 year old Ehrenfest model describing a particle in a period array of square scatterers, the system is not ergodic in most directions. In addition, with her collaborators, she has proved important and deep results about the ergodic properties of several important classes of dynamical systems such as interval exchange maps and Teichmüller dynamics.
http://www.maths.bris.ac.uk/people/profile/maxcu

Philosophy and Theology

Dr Jonathan Birch
Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, London School of Economics

Evolutionary theory offers to explain cooperative social behaviour in a wide range of species. Jonathan Birch works on the conceptual foundations of a widely accepted framework for understanding co-operation, namely, W.D. Hamilton’s theory of inclusive fitness. One of the very few philosophers to have studied this theory and its applications in depth, Birch is contributing to the amendment and expansion of the theory, and helping to adjudicate sharp controversies among biologists on theories of kin selection. His work is important not only to the philosophy of biology, and to a sophisticated philosophical understanding of evolutionary theory, but also to the way unnoticed conceptual differences can illuminate disagreement in natural science. He has contributed to the philosophy of language by indicating how the content of signals can be related to evolutionary dynamics, and he is embarking on a project that locates the role of prosocial emotions and normative judgement in the evolution of human social and ethical life. This work promises to develop philosophy at its boundary with current work in psychology, economics and anthropology.
http://www.lse.ac.uk/philosophy/people/birch.aspx

Dr Tim Button
Faculty of Philosophy, University of Cambridge

Tim Button has made insightful contributions to the philosophy of logic and mathematics. His work makes distinctive and impressive use of technical results and shows how these results can be used as useful tools in developing and exploring deep philosophical themes. In particular, his recent book, The Limits and Reasons (OUP, 2013), has reopened the debate about internal and external realism to great acclaim, a debate which has been recently ignored by the analytic tradition. He argues that we are epistemologically placed somewhere between the poles of being radically deceived and always right, but we cannot hope to say exactly where.
http://people.ds.cam.ac.uk/tecb2/

Professor Ofra Magidor
Faculty of Philosophy, University of Oxford

Professor Ofra Magidor has established an international reputation in philosophy by working across the fields of philosophical logic, philosophy of language, philosophy of mathematics and metaphysics. She uses the impetus of particular, and apparently narrow, philosophical questions – about category mistakes, for example, or about vagueness – to present radical reorientations of wide philosophical areas, especially by ranging across the sub-disciplines in the subject. Her 2013 book, Category Mistakes, revives an old problem in philosophy first articulated by Aristotle and exploited by Ryle in tackling the mind/body problem. Magidor’s comprehensive reassessment considers the varieties of ways in which category mistakes might be explained, and concludes that such mistakes are indeed meaningful, but that they fail to fulfil conversational presuppositions: so the explanation of the phenomenon is properly given by a pragmatic account. This account of what may seem a small problem has broad and important implications, not only for the philosophy of language, but also for metaphysics. Further, Magidor has published important work on other topics – on ‘semantic sovereignty’ (on the relation between semantic and physical facts, or facts about use); on arbitrary reference; on strict finitism in mathematics; and on possible worlds and the restriction of epistemic transparency. She will use the award to pursue further her interests in metaphysics (on endurantism and perdurantism), in the philosophy of language and logic (on vagueness, and on conditionals); and to finish another book connecting problems in the philosophy of language with metaphysics (beginning from arbitrary reference and semantic sovereignty). 
http://users.ox.ac.uk/~ball1646/

Dr Anna Mahtani
Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, London School of Economics

Anna Mahtani is a scholar specialising in formal epistemology whose work displays the depth of insight achievable by the deployment of formal techniques on traditional problems concerning probability and decision making, and also on the foundations of the so-called ‘epistemicism’ position on vagueness. Also characteristic of her work is an eschewal of speculation in favour of well-grounded results concerning fundamental questions, not peripheral ones. Her current work on the intensionality of deference in decision making promises to be of the utmost significance.
http://www.lse.ac.uk/philosophy/people/mahtani.aspx

Dr Holger Zellentin
Department of Theology and Religious Studies, University of Nottingham

Dr Holger Zellentin has already established himself as one of the outstanding experts on the relation of Judaism, Christianity and Islam in the formative ‘late antique’ period. Internationally educated at Strasbourg, Amsterdam, Jerusalem and Princeton, he is now Associate Professor in Religious Studies at the University of Nottingham. His first monograph, Rabbinic Parodies of Jewish and Christian Literature, re-evalutes the rabbinic movement in Roman Palestine and Sasanian Mesopotamia from the 4th to 7th centuries CE through a new analysis of the rabbis’ use of satire. His second book, The Qur’an’s Legal Culture: The Didascalia Apostolorum as Point of Departure reassesses the foundational legal principles and laws of the Qur’an by demonstrating its points of overlap and continuity with the influential Christian church-order text, the Didascalia. Dr Zellentin has also recently edited a large survey volume on Heresy and Identity in Late Antiquity. He is now working on two further monographs: one on Ritual and Law in the Qur’an and in the Late Ancient Near East, the other a further study of early rabbinical thought in context: Rabbinic Rhetoric Under the Cross. His broad intellectual goal for the future is to gain a yet fuller appreciation of the complex mutual influences of Jews, Christians and Muslims in this crucial period of development and transition.
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/theology/people/holger.zellentin

Sociology and Social Policy

Dr Lucie Cluver
Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford

Lucie Cluver conducts world leading research on the complex and extensive hazards that face AIDS-affected children. Her work has focused, for instance, on the psychological issues that AIDS-orphaned children encounter and also on how parental AIDS-illness increases child abuse and sexual risk behaviours amongst adolescent girls. These insights into the impact of AIDS on young people have led to a raft of research papers and significant funded projects that have had important results. For example, the fact that family-focused cash transfers alone are sufficient to reduce HIV-risk behaviour amongst adolescent girls, while cash + care schemes are required to produce a similar effect amongst adolescent boys is a significant finding and one that has had important practical results. The implementation of policies based on Dr Cluver’s research by governments in sub-Saharan Africa have seen 10,000 community workers trained to develop programmes for millions of AIDS-affected children in sub-Saharan Africa. The Leverhulme Prize will be used to further this work, and specifically to test the innovative integration of social welfare and abuse reduction on adolescent HIV-risk – these interventions having the potential to interrupt the negative pathways that are started by parental AIDS (increased poverty, school drop-out, mental health distress and increased transactional sexual relationships).
https://www.spi.ox.ac.uk/people/profile/cluver.html

Dr Hazem Kandil
Sociology Department, University of Cambridge

Dr Hazem Kandil is an outstanding scholar, who broke new ground with his analysis of the Egyptian regime and the 2011 uprising, published in a 2012 monograph, Soldiers, Spies and Statesmen. He followed this with the first in-depth study of the Muslim Brotherhood and its relationship with its own members (Inside the Brotherhood, 2014). He is regarded as a scholar of international standing and a leading authority on recent political events in Egypt, who has successfully challenged consensus views by articulating a clear and comprehensively researched analysis, which has advanced understanding of the coercive state, and the longer term relationships between political, military and security institutions. Dr Kandil makes extensive use of archival research, analysis of historical documents and interviews with key figures. These enable him to support his claims and develop his novel theoretical positions. Dr Kandil’s work has proved highly influential and has received extensive international attention from academia, media and government officials. His next book on Power Triangle: Military, Security and Politics in Regime Change, develops his theoretical model of the uneasy relationship between military, political, and security institutions, applying it to both Turkey and Iran. His future work will extend his interest in the military factor in social development, initially with a study of the institutional basis of American war doctrine; and subsequently extending further his national and historical sweep with a study of conscription, focusing on case studies of Egypt and France. 
http://www.sociology.cam.ac.uk/people/academic-staff/hkandil

Dr Victoria Redclift
Department of Sociology, University of Surrey

Victoria Redclift is a Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Surrey. Her methodologically and theoretically groundbreaking research is focused on new forms of political engagement in South Asia, exploring the formal and informal dimensions of practices of citizenship. Her highly topical work on the Urdu speaking community in Bangladesh at a time of transition to full citizenship brings together issues of belonging, space and rights in a context of statelessness, displacement and ongoing nation-state formation. Dr Redclift’s research works within, and pushes the boundaries of contemporary scholarship on citizenship, ethnicity and postcolonial theory, particularly around ethnic relations, political process and the challenges of diverse religious identities within modern nation-states. Her monograph, published in 2013, Statelessness and Citizenship: camps and the creation of political space, was shortlisted for the Philip Abrams prize in 2014. Dr Redclift’s new work, supported by the Philip Leverhulme Prize, builds on this important work to explore the transnational dimensions of citizenship experiences among the Bengali Muslim diaspora in Britain and the US (at a time when issues of religious identity and transnational politics are at the forefront of concern). Dr Redclift’s combination of empirical exploration, theoretical interrogation and non-academic engagement promises to provide important illumination into these complex and crucial issues. 
http://www.surrey.ac.uk/sociology/people/victoria_redclift/

Dr Katherine Smith
School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh

Dr Katherine Smith is a Reader in Social Policy whose research into the policy and legislative developments of public health and health inequalities is of international significance. Of note are her investigations into the ways in which stakeholders from commercial, academic, and third sector organisations influence health and social policies. Her work is truly interdisciplinary and through publishing extensively in sociological, medical, policy, and social policy journals she speaks to diverse audiences. She is the author of the monograph Beyond Evidence Based Policy in Public Health: the Interplay of Ideas, which is a groundbreaking analysis of the complex interplay between ideas, evidence and policy, and is based on over a hundred interviews with key informants (e.g. ministers, civil servants, researchers, advisors and journalists). It provides an extraordinary insight into how policies are negotiated, constructed and ‘made’. Supported by the Philip Leverhulme Prize she will extend this research through an exploration into how members of the public engage with issues of health inequalities. She intends to deploy and develop a range of methodological tools to enhance what has come to be referred to as ‘deliberative democracy’. Such public engagement has the potential to draw the public in the policy process and to contribute to tackling the tenacious problem of health inequalities.
http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/staff/social_policy/katherine_smith

Dr Imogen Tyler
Sociology Department, University of Lancaster

Imogen Tyler has received a number of awards and has made a major contribution to the study of inequalities. She has critically examined the processes of protest and resistance in the UK. She has an international profile and has focused on the issue of stigma, which she plans to study in more detail. She is engaged politically and practically and has played an important role in shaping thinking in these key areas of social policy. Her book Revolting Subjects has been very well received and was shortlisted for the Bread and Roses Award for Radical Publishing in 2014.
http://www.research.lancs.ac.uk/portal/en/people/imogen-tyler%28b10d1ced...

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