1. Home
  2. Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2012

Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2012

Classics

Dr Patrick Finglass
University of Nottingham
Archaic and classical Greek poetry, especially Stesichorus, Pindar and Sophocles

Professor Miriam Leonard
University College London
Classical reception, intellectual history, Greek literature and philosophy

Dr Michael Squire
King’s College London
The intersection between Graeco-Roman visual and literary cultures

Dr Peter Thonemann
University of Oxford
The history and culture of pre-Islamic Turkey

Dr Kostas Vlassopoulos
University of Nottingham
Ancient Greek history

Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences

Dr Matt Friedman
University of Oxford
Vertebrate palaeontology and evolution

Dr Richard Katz
University of Oxford
The physics of magma genesis and transport in the convecting mantle

Dr Kirsty Penkman
University of York
The application of analytical chemistry to geochronology, archaeology and earth science

Dr Laura Robinson
University of Bristol
The use of chemical tools to examine ocean-climate linkages today and in the past

Dr Paul Williams
University of Reading
Geophysical fluid dynamics

History of Art

Dr Jo Applin
University of York
American and European art of the 1950s and 1960s

Dr Matthew Potter
Northumbria University
Visual culture and the construction of national identities

Dr Richard Taws
University College London
Eighteenth and nineteenth-century European art and visual culture

Dr Tamara Trodd
University of Edinburgh
For her work on media and technologies in twentieth-century and contemporary art

Dr Leon Wainwright
Open University
The history of modern and contemporary art in Britain and the Caribbean

Law

Dr Kimberley Brownlee
University of Warwick
Legal and moral theory: civil disobedience, ideals, punishment, human rights

Professor James Chalmers
University of Glasgow
Criminal law

Dr Ioannis Lianos
University College London
The interaction of economic thought with the legal system

Dr Marc Moore
University College London
Anglo-American corporate law and governance; capital markets and theory of the firm

Ms Anthea Roberts
London School of Economics and Political Science
Public international law, particularly investment treaty law and arbitration

Mathematics and Statistics

Dr Toby Gee
Imperial College London
Number theory

Dr Jonathan Marchini
University of Oxford
Statistical genetics

Dr Andre Neves
Imperial College London
Geometric analysis

Dr Christoph Ortner
University of Warwick
Numerical analysis and applied analysis

Professor Lasse Rempe-Gillen
University of Liverpool
Complex dynamics

Medieval, Early Modern and Modern History

Dr Duncan Bell
University of Cambridge
The history of imperial ideologies in nineteenth and twentieth century Britain

Dr Alexander Morrison
University of Liverpool
Central Asian history, Russian Imperial history and South Asian history

Dr Sadiah Qureshi
University of Birmingham
Modern history of race, empire and science

Dr Sujit Sivasundaram
University of Cambridge
Modern imperial and world history from 1750–1850, especially Asia and the Pacific

Dr David Todd
King’s College London
Global history of ideas in France and Anglo-French Imperial relations, 1780–1914

2012 citations

Classics

Professor Patrick Finglass
Department of Classics, University of Nottingham

In nine years since the award of his DPhil, Professor Patrick Finglass has established himself as one of the world's leading scholars of Greek lyric and tragic poetry. His monumental commentaries on Sophoclean tragedy (Electra, 2007; Ajax, 2011) are already standard works of reference, a remarkable achievement for a scholar of his age; yet Finglass has produced not only these, but also a third major commentary (on Pindar's Pythian 11, 2007) and a substantial number of magisterial articles, especially on the text and interpretation of Sophocles. His work to date is characterized by an extraordinary combination of the energy and ambition of youth and the erudition and judgement that normally come only with a lifetime's experience. Commentaries on the remaining plays of Sophocles and on the fragments of the lyric poet, Stesichorus, are eagerly awaited; these will further cement what is already a towering international reputation.
https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/classics/people/patrick.finglass

Professor Miriam Leonard
Department of Greek and Latin, University College London

Professor Miriam Leonard is a powerful and original voice in the field of classical reception studies. Intellectually imaginative, sensitive and critical, she speaks across disciplines; her internationally-significant work lies at the intersection of Classics and History of Ideas in modern Europe, particularly France and Germany. Her monographs Athens and Paris and Socrates and the Jews explore the ways in which a European identity has been created, and her next book will move beyond classical philosophy to investigate the role of tragedy in the emergence of modernity. Professor Leonard is also an innovative teacher, using Socratic teaching methods and teaching across disciplines. Her work illustrates not only how Classics as a scholarly discipline was formed, but also the enduring power of the classical texts to provide a way of speaking about contemporary societies.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/classics/staff/fulltimestaff/miriamleonard

Dr Michael Squire
Department of Classics, King’s College London

Dr Michael Squire’s research into the visual culture of the Graeco-Roman world has made a fundamental contribution to both classical art history and reception studies, and has changed the way that classicists and art historians think about the relationship between ancient art and literature.  Dr Squire has an impressive publication record, which includes three highly-regarded monographs and three edited books.  His most recent monograph on the Tabulae Iliacae – the first on the subject in English – was awarded the James R Wiseman Prize by the Archaeological Institute of America, and has been described as “one of the most significant analyses of Graeco-Roman art, replication and collecting in recent years”.  The international pedigree of Dr Squire’s research is reflected in the range of journals and books in which he has been published; in the variety of international prizes and fellowships he has won (including the Alexander von-Humboldt Stipendiat in Berlin and Munich); and in the fact that he has published in French, German and Italian, as well as in English.  Dr Squire’s current research into the Imagines of Philostratus continues to cross disciplinary boundaries, and it will certainly gain the same sort of international recognition as his previous work.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/people/academic/squire/inde...

Dr Peter Thonemann
Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford

Dr Peter Thonemann is an ancient Greek historian and epigrapher of extraordinary range and subtlety, whose work – notably his major monograph on the Maeander Valley – has set new standards for research in ancient historical geography. His work integrates the study of all forms of ancient evidence, and deploys innovative theoretical models, to tell an enormously rich story of the interplay between man and landscape across a vast chronological range, from the Iron Age to the 13th century AD. He has also made very substantial contributions to the epigraphy of Asia Minor, and to broader public engagement, not least through his Birth of Classical Europe (co-authored with the late Simon Price). With two substantial edited volumes (on Attalid Asia Minor and on Roman Phrygia), and a major new monograph on the rural societies of Anatolia under way, his stellar research career is well set.  
http://www.wadham.ox.ac.uk/fellows-staff/academics/dr-peter-thonemann.html
http://mama.csad.ox.ac.uk/

Dr Kostas Vlassopoulos
Department of Classics, University of Nottingham

Dr Kostas Vlassopoulos is a historian of the ancient Greek world, whose work is notable for asking bold new questions of well-worn topics. Few would have the ambition or the intellectual range to attempt the topic of his first book: a wide-ranging critique of Eurocentric approaches to Greek history, Unthinking the Polis.  Dr Vlassopoulos has followed this up with a more broadly accessible work on the legacy of ancient political thought, an ambitious new history of the interactions of Greeks and Barbarians, and more recently he has turned his attention to the subject of Greek slavery, conceiving slavery as a relationship of domination rather than emphasising the slave’s status as property. His work is notable for the depth of his familiarity with historical writing on Greece - in a range of languages and traditions and over a long time period – and for his willingness to relate ancient history to contemporary political issues. 
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/classics/people/konstantinos.vlassopoulos

Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences

Dr Matt Friedman
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford

Matt Friedman is an exceptional young vertebrate palaeontologist who uses a deep knowledge of fish taxonomy and their geological record to answer a wide range of highly topical evolutionary, functional biological and ecological issues. These include the solution of the longstanding controversy on the evolution of flat fishes with the description of a fossil with eye and skull characters intermediate between those of flat and 'normal' fishes. His reconstruction of the evolutionary history of fishes using a number of statistical and phylogenetic models particularly as it relates to mass extinction and recovery in the Upper Cretaceous and succeeding Cenozoic has overturned a number of earlier hypotheses. Thus for example it emphasises that prior to the extinction event, and contrary to prior beliefs, large planktivorous fishes were widely distributed in both Jurassic and Cretaceous oceans and became extinct at the same time as the dinosaurs. His detailed analysis of the spiny-finned fishes has demonstrated their explosive diversification following the extinction event and sets the standard for any future phylogenetic and ecological studies.
http://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/people/profiles/academic/mattf

Dr Richard Katz
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford

Dr Richard Katz is a leading early career mathematical geophysicist whose work is making significant contributions to our understanding of processes involved in the extraction and transportation of melt from deep in the mantle to the surface.  
His work to combine physical and chemical parameterizations of melt extraction and flow is having a wide impact as is his establishment of a mathematical framework for two-phase flow in magma migration. The European Geosciences Union has recognized him with an outstanding young scientist award and the European Research Council has awarded him a Starter Grant to investigate coupling of climate with magmatism at mid-ocean ridges.
http://foalab.earth.ox.ac.uk/

Dr Kirsty Penkman
Department of Chemistry, University of York

Understanding past environmental change requires accurate appreciation of when events occurred, which requires reliable dating techniques. Amino acid dating, has long been regarded as being too unreliable yet its appeal in being able to assign the age of death in living organisms has driven Kirsty Penkman to investigate how reliability may be improved. Working with geologists, biologists and chemists, to comprehend and quantify the factors introducing inaccuracies, Penkman has led a major breakthrough in reducing the amino acid dating error. As amino acids are common in many sedimentary sequences since the last ice age, Penkman has used the improved technique to form a new appreciation of stratigraphic sequences within the UK, an impressive feat that has given her significant international visibility. Now established as the world leader in this field, Penkman can look to applying amino acid dating in a variety of key palaeo-environmental problems across the globe.
http://www.york.ac.uk/chemistry/staff/academic/o-s/kpenkman/

Dr Laura Robinson
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol

Laura Robinson has made leading contributions using a variety of techniques to enable reconstruction of past climate changes over recent glaciations. Key to understanding the mechanisms of climate change is accurately constraining when changes occur, so that the changes can be seen in their correct sequence, and she has used radioactive isotope signals to provide such dating information for major changes in the biological and chemical cycling of nutrients and carbon in the oceans that accompanied the glaciations. Most recently, her study of the radiocarbon signals in Southern Ocean carbonates has provided good evidence for the Southern Ocean as the source of the rising atmospheric CO2 that helped end the last ice age, ushering in the Holocene period of warm climates, during which modern agriculture and civilizations have developed.
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/earthsciences/people/laura-f-robinson/index.html

Dr Paul Williams
Department of Meteorology, University of Reading

An innovative and highly original researcher in geophysical fluid dynamics, Dr Paul Williams has made significant contributions to dynamical meteorology and oceanography. In the former field Dr Williams developed an improved numerical time stepping scheme for numerical weather prediction models that has been widely adopted by meteorological agencies around the world, and the scheme has become known as the Robert-Asselin-Williams filter. He has also pioneered the development of a new algorithm for forecasting clear-air turbulence which is a major hazard for the commercial airline industry, injuring hundreds of passengers annually and causing structural damage to aircraft.  The turbulence is caused by breaking gravity waves, a phenomenon that Dr Williams has studied both in the laboratory and theoretically. In the oceans gravity waves play an important role in global circulation but they are generally too small to be explicitly represented in ocean circulation models. In recognition of this fact, Dr Williams is also carrying out research on novel stochastic parameterisations to represent these waves, and other small scale dynamical processes, in atmospheric and ocean circulation models.
http://www.met.reading.ac.uk/~williams/

History of Art

Dr Jo Applin
Department of History of Art, University of York

Dr Jo Applin is an outstanding scholar with a distinctive and strong reputation in sculpture studies.  She has already established herself internationally in the field of American & British art post 1960 with her enterprising and insightful style, culminating in the recent publication of her book Eccentric Objects: Rethinking Sculpture in 1960’s America (Yale 2012). In this invigorating study she explores the work of Lee Bontecou, Claes Oldenburg, Lucas Samaras, H.C. Westermann and Bruce Nauman opening new and exciting pathways into imagery of the three dimensional object in that period. Her forthcoming monograph on Yayoi Kusame will be the first on the Japanese artist’s period in America in the 1960’s, due to be published in December.  Her future plans include a further monograph looking afresh at the artist Lee Lozano and the co-curation of an innovative major international loan exhibition entitled ‘Flesh’ at the newly refurbished York City Art Gallery in 2016, focusing on representations of flesh in the 20th and 21st centuries. This will bring cutting edge art historical scholarship to a wider contemporary public.
http://www.york.ac.uk/history-of-art/staff/applin/

Dr Matthew Potter
Department of Arts, Northumbria University

Dr Matthew Potter’s innovative research resonates across art history and cultural studies and has received international recognition.  His contribution to a largely neglected field, the cultural influence of Germany upon British art in the post- Romantic period, is given a clear voice in his most recent book: The Inspirational Genius of Germany: British Art and Germanism, 1850-1939 (MUP 2012).  This study is of major significance, not least in reshaping our understanding of British art during the period, its historiography and cultural identities.  His earlier research when he was a visiting fellow at the ANU and at the Menzies Centre, focused upon hybridised identities of British and Australian Anglo-German settlers where he challenged, as he continues to do, core and periphery models. His current research project investigates the construction of national identities in visual culture of the British world. This is effected by an analysis of the afterlife of political prints from the Georgian period over a hundred years of upheaval, stretching from the battle of Waterloo to the First World War and will involve a major re-evaluation of material building upon recent reception studies.   
http://www.northumbria.ac.uk/sd/academic/sass/about/arts/staff/M_Potter/

Dr Richard Taws
Department of History of Art, University College London

Richard Taws has built upon a strong existing tradition with regard to the visual culture of the French revolutionary period. His own contribution is, however, brilliantly original. He seizes upon apparently marginal materials like assignats and caricatures to develop searching analyses of the social and political developments of the period. There is a genuine intellectual excitement that characterises all his writing, and his forthcoming book will undoubtedly enhance his already well attested international reputation.      
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/art-history/about_us/academic_staff/richard_taws

Dr Tamara Trodd
Department of History of Art, University of Edinburgh

In her work on "Art after Photography" and in her studies on the projected image in contemporary art, Dr Trodd seeks to recover what she refers to as "avantgarde technological enthusiasm", that is, exploring how the visual arts are not be understood as oppositional to technology but as legitimate exploiters of any and every technological advance that becomes accessible to the artist.  This is, of course, not a uniquely innovative issue for art history: one thinks of the ancient application of the drill to sculpted stone and the Renaissance linkage of oil paint with canvas and the contemporary development of mass-produced prints.  By working on the advent of new means of visual expression through new technologies in our own time Tamara Trodd is by no means claiming that such issues are irrelevant to the art of the past.  In fact, her work precisely circumvents that kind of rigid compartmentalising by concentrating not only on media-specific works in photography and film but also on the interactions of those media with more traditional forms such as painting, drawing and sculpture.  On the basis of an exhaustive exploration of the prinmary material and a sophisticated understanding of the relevant theorteical frameworks, her work has the potential to make a really significant impact in the field; to move the discipline of art history forward and by building a body of publication focussed on those issues, to develop methodological possibilities that other scholars and students will be able to consider and apply.
http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/edinburgh-college-art/history-ar...

Dr Leon Wainwright
Department of Art History, Open University

Leon Wainwright has a distinguished record of ground-breaking publications which seek to expand the geographical imagination of art history while also ensuring that our histories of the twentieth century are inclusive of the many sites and practices of art making. This does not involve merely adding in artists from the Caribbean or the Subcontinent. The detailed exploration of the artists and their migrations, conversations and transformations of the issues of the modern which clearly and fundamentally include colonial and postcolonial negations is undertaken from hitherto under examined positions and perspectives. In 2011 Leon Wainwright published Timed Out: Art and the Transnational Caribbean (Manchester University Press) on modern and contemporary art in the aftermath of empire, using the Caribbean as point of shifted perspective on modernism itself. He has written many articles on modernists from both India and the Caribbean, providing the detailed studies of individual careers necessary to avoid the problem of geo-ethnicism. In addition to this specialist area, Leon Wainwright has published extensively and probingly on the challenges facing art history in the current pressure to internationalize and globalise. He has equally made a contribution to art theory and to reshaping the curriculum. The distinction of his work lies in the many forms from detailed cutting edge-scholarship to curriculum initiatives through which Leon Wainwright has challenged the Eurocentrism of the discipline by substantive demonstrations of ways of writing art histories that are sensitive to specificities and expand our conceptions of the world of art.  His is a contribution to art made in and in relation to Britain and its imperial histories as well as to the larger picture and process of changing the geographies of the discipline.
http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/arthistory/wainwright.shtml

Law

Dr Kimberley Brownlee
Warwick Law School, University of Warwick

Dr Kimberley Brownlee’s work on a broad range of issues in legal, moral, and political philosophy is extremely well regarded, and her distinctive and coherent approach will ensure that she remains a leading figure in this area of study for many years to come.  Dr Brownlee has informed her thinking about crucial legal problems by drawing on moral and political ideals and principles in novel and interesting ways, producing cutting edge, highly relevant, and deeply thought out jurisprudential scholarship.  Her major project to date has been her book, Conscience and Conviction: The Case for Civil Disobedience, which is forthcoming with Oxford University Press in their prestigious Oxford Legal Philosophy series.  In this work, Dr Brownlee develops a sustained and compelling case for civil disobedience, and, importantly, provides a careful account of how civil disobedience should be understood and should be distinguished from related attitudes and actions. Conscience and Conviction will surely be a central reference point for any future work done on civil disobedience.  Dr Brownlee’s next major project will develop her interesting and novel idea that there is a human right against severe social deprivation, which will have significant implications for the use of quarantine and solitary confinement. Her preliminary work in this area has already been widely discussed: no doubt, her next book, like the one that she has completed, will generate enormous interest.  Dr Brownlee’s work is highly significant, and has engaged and stimulated the research of others in a way that is impressive for a young scholar. 
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/law/staff/academic/brownlee/

Professor James Chalmers
School of Law, University of Glasgow

James Chalmers is an outstanding young Scots lawyer and one of the strongest criminal lawyers of his age in the UK. He is a brilliant and versatile scholar who writes for audiences at all levels ranging from the first year student to appellate judges. His work is extensive, wide-ranging and influential.  He is a prolific doctrinal author with three monographs and three jointly authored articles in the Modern Law Review. These have made a significant impact on law reform and he also has a strong track record in funded research. Despite his Scots Law focus he has nonetheless achieved international recognition. There are few Regius chairs in law in the UK and even fewer held by 36 year olds. James Chalmers has huge potential and a stimulating and innovative project on ‘overcriminalisation’ which will be greatly assisted by the award of a Philip Leverhulme prize.
http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/law/staff/jameschalmers/

Dr Ioannis Lianos
Faculty of Laws, University College London

Dr Ioannis Lianos is one of the leading and most respected antitrust/competition law scholars working in the UK today, with a well-established international reputation. His work is interdisciplinary and encompasses both the empirical and theoretical. He works particularly at the interface of competition law and economics, where he employs to formidable effect his expertise and training in microeconomics and sociology as well as law to make a distinctive contribution to a number of important debates. His rigorous publications span a wide area of competition law and include important pieces on the integration of economic concepts in law and of the problems involved in the use of economic expertise in competition litigation, and he has an equal facility in both the substantive and enforcement/procedural fields. He is remarkably active: inter alia he has established two research centres at his university (UCL); is the co-founder of the prestigious Global Competition Law and Economics research conference series; has presented his work at a large number of academic institutions and regulatory authorities around the world; and been appointed to a research chair at the Ecole National d’Administration to lead and manage an interdisciplinary team of researchers studying the impact of the practice of impact assessment in Europe. His current and projected research is highly relevant to policy-making and is having, and should continue to have, significant effects on practice. The Leverhulme prize will enable him to progress his project on the evaluation of economic evidence in the legal framework and its effect on change in economic theory.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/academics/profiles/index.shtml?lianos

Dr Marc Moore
Faculty of Laws, University College London

Marc Moore works in the field of Anglo-American corporate law and governance and capital markets. His scholarship is interdisciplinary and sits at the interface of law, economics and social policy. His Leverhulme grant will be used to support research which addresses the issue of whether Anglo-American equity markets are socially relevant today. The panel was impressed by the depth and range of Dr Moore’s existing scholarship and the contemporary relevance of his work.  His work undoubtedly offers new insights in the field and his ability and willingness to discuss corporate governance and company law outside of the usual contractarian paradigm is particularly impressive. Dr Moore’s work is highly respected within his home discipline of law as well as outside of it and the Trust was delighted to be able to support work which makes us reconsider and reimagine established academic models.  
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/academics/profiles/index.shtml?moore

Ms Anthea Roberts
Department of Law, London School of Economics

Anthea Roberts is an international lawyer who researches and teaches across an unusually wide range of fields in her subject.  She has researched and published on fundamental, general aspects of international law, such as changing approaches to customary international law and the role of national courts in international law, and also more specialized topics such as the interpretation of investment treaties and universal civil jurisdiction.  Even when examining relatively narrow, technical fields, she uses general principles as powerful analytical tools, and draws out significant implications for general international law from her studies of particular aspects of it.  Across the full range of her work, Ms Roberts maintains a very high quality of research and writing; she is the only sole author to have been twice awarded the Deak Prize for the year’s best article by a scholar under the age of 40 to be published in the prestigious American Journal of International Law.  It is noteworthy that the two articles were on very different subjects, demonstrating Ms Roberts’s versatility as well as the consistently high quality of her work.  She has already made varied and important contributions to scholarship in international law, and has the potential to continue to do so.  For these reasons, Ms Roberts is recognized as one of the leading international lawyers of her generation.
http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/law/staff/anthea-roberts.htm

Mathematics and Statistics

Dr Toby Gee
Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London

Dr. Toby Gee is awarded a Philip Leverhulme Prize for his work in Number Theory. This centres on connections between automorphic forms and Galois Representations, as envisaged by the Langlands Program. His achievements include a complete treatment of companion forms, the proof of the Sato-Tate Conjecture (with Barnet-Lamb and Geraghty), and a substantial contribution to the Buzzard-Diamond-Jarvis conjecture. His solutions of these major outstanding problems use new methods of much wider applicability. They have subsequently driven the subject forward at surprising speed. The new ideas have been synthesized (with Buzzard) into a clear and precise family of general conjectures concerning the fundamental connections of the global Langlands Program. 
http://www2.imperial.ac.uk/~tsg/

Dr Jonathan Marchini
Department of Statistics, University of Oxford

The explosion of genetic science since the first draft sequence of the human genome in 2001 has been accompanied by an explosion in the quantity and complexity of genetic data. At the same time there has been an explosion in the variety and realism of the scientific problems attacked. Traditional statistical methods are quite unsuited to these tasks, and entirely new approaches to statistical modelling, analysis and interpretation are required. Jonathan Marchini has led the way by constructing powerful and ingenious novel statistical methodology for population and medical genetics, together with associated fast computational algorithms and software. The advances he has made in developing this essential statistical theory have been crucial in enabling important new genetic understandings and discoveries.
http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/~marchini/

Dr Andre Neves
Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London

Dr Andre Neves is a Reader in Pure Mathematics at Imperial College, London. His field is geometric analysis, an area in which techniques from the analysis of partial differential equations are applied to geometric problems. He has made deep and original contributions to our understanding of the geometry of manifolds in two ways:  First, by studying parabolic flows on manifolds. In particular, he studied singularity formation in Lagrangian mean curvature flow and found, in collaboration with Bray, the Yamabe invariant of 3-dimensional real projective space and a counterexample to the weaker version of the Thomas-Yau conjecture on the long term existence and convergence of Lagrangian flows. Second, by studying minimal surfaces on the manifold, in collaboration with Brendle and Marques, he disproved the Min-Oo conjecture, a characterisation of hemispheres of round spheres, which prior to his discovery was widely believed to be true. Recently, with Marques, he made the spectacular announcement of a proof of the Willmore conjecture, one of the big open problems in the field. This conjecture gives a lower bound on the amount of bending energy needed to immerse a torus in three-dimensional space. Its proof, and the powerful min-max  theory it uses, has created a lot of excitement and is expected to give a handle to several other hard open problems in the field in the area of geometric analysis.
http://www2.imperial.ac.uk/~aneves/

Dr Christoph Ortner
Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick

Dr Ortner works on some of the central problems in solid mechanics and materials science, in particular on issues relating to atomistic and continuum theories of fracture.  He has already established a significant reputation within the area of computational applied mathematics for his work on atomistic models of coarse grained materials.  Dr Ortner’s work has created a clear framework to approach the huge mathematical challenges of the field.  His development of the theory of atomistic/continuum coupling methods for simulating material defects has filled a crucial gap in knowledge in materials science.  However, his work is also distinguished by the way it points forward to the analysis of higher dimensional problems and by its breadth: he has also made important contributions in areas such as the Lavrentiev phenomenon in the Calculus of Variations.  Dr Ortner intends to build on this previous research in a number of ways, including project on extensions to surface effects and electronic structure models.
http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/staff/C.Ortner/

Professor Lasse Rempe-Gillen
Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool

Professor Rempe-Gillen works in complex dynamics, specializing in the dynamics of transcendental holomorphic functions, a field in which he has made a number of very important contributions. In particular, Prof. Rempe-Gillen has been recognized for his achievements relating to Eremenko’s conjecture.  In 2010 he was awarded the London Mathematical Society Whitehead Prize for this work. Other significant achievements are the proof (with van Strien) of the density of hyperbolicity for many classes of real transcendental entire functions and circle maps, including the Arnold family, and his demonstration that the escaping set of the exponential map is connected.
Prof. Rempe-Gillen’s current research continues to focus on Eremenko’s Conjecture. His recent work on the topology of Julia sets of transcendental entire functions is directed towards developing a new strategy to construct potential counterexamples. He also aims to pursue further work in measurable transcendental dynamics.
http://www.liv.ac.uk/mathematical-sciences/staff/lasse-rempe/

Medieval, Early Modern and Modern History

Dr Duncan Bell
Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Cambridge

Duncan Bell’s writing and research exhibits an unusual range, having made significant contributions to debates in imperial history, intellectual history and International Relations. His first monograph provided a re-appraisal of the idea ‘of Greater Britain’ in which the metropole and the white dominions would be united in some form of federation. The study brought together a discussion of the technologies of empire with an analysis of the role of federation in the thinking of luminaries like J.A. Froude. He has since gone on to explore the role of empire in liberal political thought, including the writings of J.S. Mill, and has completed a second monograph on this subject. The role of the United States in British thinking about federation and empire has been a strand in his earlier research, and he now seeks to tease out the British-American relationship in greater detail.
http://www.polis.cam.ac.uk/contacts/staff/bell-duncan.html

Dr Alexander Morrison
School of History, University of Liverpool

Dr Alexander Morrison is a pioneering young historian of the Russian Empire, whose work on Russia’s expansion into Central Asia in the nineteenth century, based on substantial work in archives in Russia and Central Asia, mounts a serious challenge to standard pictures of Russian imperialism. Dr Morrison, by adopting a rigorously comparative method, steps outside the often inward-looking world of Russian history, to demonstrate clearly that Russia, far from following an imperial Sonderweg, as has routinely been claimed, is directly comparable to other imperial powers, in particular to Great Britain. His project, to write a comprehensive history of the Russian conquest of Central Asia promises to provide the definitive account of a major transformation in global history that was of considerable economic and political significance.
http://liverpool.academia.edu/AlexanderMorrison

Dr Sadiah Qureshi
Department of History, University of Birmingham

Dr Sadiah Qureshi is an outstanding historian of science, trained in both the Natural Sciences (BA) and in the History and Philosophy of Science (MPhil) at Cambridge. She completed her PhD on ‘Human ethnological exhibitions in London, 1800-1855’ at the University of Cambridge and was subsequently a postdoctoral Research Fellow on the Leverhulme Trust-funded interdisciplinary project on Victorian notions of the past: ‘Past and Present: Abandoning the Past in an Age of Progress’, 2006-2010. She won the ‘Best Scholarly illustrated’ award for her book Peoples on parade: Exhibition, empire and anthropology in nineteenth-century Britain (Chicago University  Press 2011) from the Association of American University Presses. Dr Qureshi’s work on the commercial exhibition of foreign peoples has made significant contributions to the cultural history of Victorian Britain, studies of race and ethnicity, and the history of science. In her imaginative, subtle and precise analysis, she has overturned assumptions about the lasting importance of such exhibitions and recast them as crucial opportunities for intercultural contact and scientific research in their contemporary context, as well as with lasting relevance for modern notions of race. Her future work will include further investigation of the interaction of conceptions of race, empire and science in relation to endangered peoples, with a particular focus issues of genocide, humanitarianism and modern settler colonial societies in Africa, North America and Oceania.
http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/staff/profiles/history/qureshi-sadiah.aspx

Dr Sujit Sivasundaram
Faculty of History, University of Cambridge

Dr Sujit Sivasundaram is an outstanding scholar of remarkable creativity, productivity, and novelty. His research spans a considerable range of connected but also distinct sub-disciplines: the history of empire, knowledge, religion, science, medicine, and the environment.  He joins a recent intellectual movement which maps imperialism through examining colonies as laboratories for scientific discovery. In doing so, he makes links with indigenous science, and construes empire partly in terms of mastery of environments as well as of peoples.  Dr Sivasundaram’s first book, Nature and the Godly Empire (Cambridge University Press, 2005) was the first account of the relationship between nineteenth-century science and Christianity in the non-Western world, and has recently been issued in paperback.  His forthcoming work, Islanded: Britain, Sri Lanka and the Bounds of an Indian Ocean Colony (University of Chicago Press, 2013) opens up a new perspective on the history of empire by focussing on oceans, islands, and coastlands.  
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/directory/sps20@cam.ac.uk

Dr David Todd
Department of History, King’s College London

Dr David Todd has made fundamental contributions to two areas of historical enquiry: the history of economic thought and French imperial history. In his Identité Économique de la France, and a series of important essays on the history of political economy, he shows how economic ideas were translated, resisted, and indigenised as they moved across the nineteenth-century world. He argues, in particular, that in France, unlike in Britain, economic and political liberalism were at odds, and the response to Smith and Ricardo was conditioned by local politics, by the persistence of early modern forms of mercantilist ideology, and by France's predicament as a latecomer to the industrial revolution. Todd is at work now on a second major book on the structure of French imperialism between the collapse of Napoleon and the Third Republic, from which he has already published influential synoptic essays and an article on fiscal policy in colonial Algeria. Writing extensively in both English and French, Todd is emerging as an important bridge between the historical worlds of Britain and France.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/history/people/staff/academic/todd/i...

Keep in touch
Sign up for our funding bulletin to receive:
  • details of scheme opening dates and deadlines
  • advance notice of changes to award criteria
  • listings of grants made
  • a PDF of our newsletter, containing short articles describing recently funded research.
Our e-bulletin is aimed at research support staff, current grant holders and those considering making an application.
Contact
The Leverhulme Trust
1 Pemberton Row
London
EC4A 3BG
General enquiries
020 7042 9888